Country Reports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson 16: Wrap it Up

Your sandwich should now look something like this:

 
Topic Sentence

Israel is a food lover's paradise.

Signal Phrase

According to travel writer Sally Sanchez,

Evidence

"The food in Israel is delicious" (Sanchez).

Wrap

 

 

 

Now it's time to wrap things up. The "wrap" is often the hardest part to write because there are many possibilities, and there is no single "formula" that works well in every case. You just have to toy with it until you are satisfied. (Nobody said writing was easy).

Let's review some of the possibilities:

 
Ways to Wrap Up a Paragraph Example

Restate the topic sentence in different words.

 

Explain the meaning of your evidence in simple, everyday language.

 

Illustrate the point with an analogy

 

Explain the significance of your evidence.

 

Ask a rhetorical question.

 

Extrapolate from the evidence. (If your evidence is true, what else is logically true?)

 

Add a piece of information from the same (or a different) source.

 
 

 

In this case, I'm going to go with the last option. To do this, I'll follow these steps:

  1. I'm going to look for some additional information in the article by Sanchez.
  2. I'm going to put it in my own words, so I don't have two direct quotes in a row.
  3. I'm going to add a parenthetical citation at the end of my sentence, to show the reader that Sanchez is also the source of this information.

Our finished example might look like this:

 
Topic Sentence

Israel is a food-lovers paradise.

Signal Phrase

According to travel writer Sally Sanchez,

Evidence

"The food in Israel is delicious" (Sanchez)."

Wrap

Falafel is a popular favorite with both tourists and locals (Sanchez).

 


Lesson Steps

 
1.

Wrap up your paragraph with a sentence or two.

2.

Congratulations! You're done with this lesson.