Grammar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pronouns

The word “pronoun” comes from the Latin for “in place of.” A pronoun is a word that you use “in place of” a noun. In short, it’s a substitute word that takes the place of a noun.

Here are some examples of pronouns:

How would the English language sound without pronouns? See for yourself:

English without Pronouns English with Pronouns

Sandy came to school today. Sandy was wearing a red dress and Sandy's hair was bunched up in a pony tail. Before Sandy's first class, Sandy spent a few minutes gossiping with Sandy's best friend. Then the bell rang and Sandy ran into class, but Sandy's teacher said that Sandy was late and Sandy had to get a pass.

Sandy came to school today. She was wearing a red dress and her hair was bunched up in a pony tail. Before her first class, she spent a few minutes gossiping with her best friend. Then the bell rang and she ran into class, but her teacher said that she was late and she had to get a pass.

 

What do we call the word to which a pronoun refers? In other words, what do we call the word for which the pronoun is “substituting”? 

Instructions for the Quiz

In each sentence, the pronoun is underlined.

Your job is to determine the pronoun's antecedent. In other words, choose the "original" word for which the pronoun is substituting.