Grammar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forming Compound Sentences

To form a compound sentence, we must splice two clauses together.

To splice = connect

As a general rule, there are only two ways to splice two (independent) clauses:

  1. Connect the clauses with a semicolon.
    • I cooked dinner; Julie set the table.
  2. Connect the clauses with a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (fanboy).
    • I cooked dinner, for Julie set the table.
    • I cooked dinner, and Julie set the table.
    • I cooked dinner, nor Julie set the table.
    • I cooked dinner, but Julie set the table.
    • I cooked dinner, or Julie set the table
    • I cooked dinner, yet Julie set the table.
    • I cooked dinner, so Julie set the table.

In this example, the sentence with "nor" has been crossed out, because "nor" is an odd conjunction that doesn't follow the usual rules. In fact, please forget that "nor" even exists. From now on, we shall call the coordinating conjunctions "faboys" (without the n)

Instructions for the Quia Quiz

The quiz asks you questions like this:

 

Your job is to fix the sentence in the editable text box.

Hopefully you noticed that the sentence has two clauses, but they have not been spliced properly:

To fix the sentence, you have two choices:

  1. Connect the clauses with a semicolon.
    • My uncle is rich; his car is expensive.
  2. Connect the clauses with a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (a fanboy—but don't use "nor").
    • My uncle is rich, for his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, and his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, nor his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, but his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, or his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, yet his car is expensive.
    • My uncle is rich, so his car is expensive.

All of these answers are "correct". Of course, in the context of this particular sentence, some of the "faboys" make more sense than others. But any of them can be used to create a grammatically correct compound sentence.