Grammar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implied Subjects

Let's start with a few definitions:

explicit

=

stated clearly and in detail, leaving no room for confusion or doubt.

implicit

=

implied though not plainly expressed.

implied

=

suggested but not directly expressed

 

Consider the following sentence:

To make this sentence sound a bit more natural, we can substitute the pronoun "he" for "John" in the second clause.

In fact, we can leave out the "he" altogether.

In this case, we leave out the comma between the two clauses:

This example illustrates a rule of the English language:

If the subject of the second clause is the same as the subject of the first clause, we are allowed to omit (leave out) the subject of the second clause, as the subject of the second clause is implied.

Here are a few more examples:

Instead of writing this:

  • The dog barked, and [it] ran around the yard.

We can write this:

  • The dog barked and ran around the yard.

What is the subject of the second clause? The dog, of course. The subject of the second clause (the dog) is implied instead of explicitely restated.

Note that when we leave out the subject of the second clause, we also leave out the comma that separates the two clauses.

 

Instead of writing this:

  • Sally read the letter, and [she] immediately called her boyfriend.

We can write this:

  • Sally read the letter and immediately called her boyfriend.

What is the subject of the second clause? Sally, of course. The subject of the second clause (Sally) is implied instead of explicitely restated.

Note that when we leave out the subject of the second clause, we also leave out the comma that separates the two clauses.