Grammar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implied Subjects (1)

Explicit Implicit / Implied

stated directly

  • He explicitly said that we should stay here.

In other words, he said it very clearly: "Stay here!"

stated indirectly

  • He implied that we should stay here.

In other words, he suggested that we should stay here. Probably, he said something like this: "I would stay here, if I were you." The meaning is clear enough, but he didn't say it directly.

 

It's time to learn this important rule of the English language:

In a compound sentence, if the subject of the second clause is the same as the subject of the first clause, you can omit the explicit restatement of the subject. (That is, you can leave out the subject of the second clause, because the reader gets it, without having to be told).

In such cases, we say that the subject of the second clause is implied.

 

Study this example:

In this sentence, the subject of the second clause (he), is the same as the subject of the first clause (John). Therefore, we are allowed to leave it out.

Note: When you leave out the subject of the second clause, you must also leave out the comma that separates the two clauses.

 

Here is another example:

What is the subject of the second clause? The dog, of course. (The dog is the one who is running around the yard). But we don't have to say it explicity. The reader gets it. We can leave out "the dog" in the second clause.

In such cases, we say that the subject of the second clause is implied. (And once again, notice that we have also left out the comma between the two clauses).

One more example:

Instructions for the Quiz

For each sentence, identify the subject of the second clause.

Note: All the sentences are hybrid sentences; therefore, in each case, the subject of the second clause is implied (not explicitly stated).